Hove Ship

The Hove Ship from Hove's Victorian seafront shelters. It represents a 16th century French galley and commemorates French attacks on the coast of Hove.

Hove's original coat of arms were granted 1899 and includes a ship at the top of the crest. The ship that has run ashore on a shingle beach represents a 16th century French galley and commemorates the French attacks on the coast of Hove in the early part of that century. The ship has been retained in the new combined Coat of Arms when Brighton & Hove became a unitary authority in 1997.
Hove Crest 1899-1997
Hove Crest 1899-1997
The motto is Floreat Hova (May Hove Flourish). The crest also references the original parish church of Hove with St. Andrew's cross on a field of gold, and St Leonards, the patron saint of prisoners and of the parish church of Aldrington with prisoners' shackles on a red field. The martlets on the shield are emblems of Sussex. The yellow relief decorations on the mid 19th century seafront shelters in Hove references the same ship as a symbol of Hove.
Hove Seafront Shelter Shelter Panel Close Up