West Blatchington Windmill

Grade II listed smock mill at West Blatchington Hove, built ca 1823, which has been restored and is open to the public.

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The first record of a windmill in Sussex goes back to 1155 and no less than some 900 have been recorded in Sussex since then, most of which are now lost. Built circa 1823 on a flint & brick tower, West Blatchington Windmill is one of England’s most unusual and attractive ‘smock’ mills. Six-sided instead of the conventional eight, recycled ship’s timbers were used in the construction and much of the original machinery remains intact. Beautifully depicted in a painting by John Constable in 1825, she provided the flour and animal feeds for Court Farm.

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Following a disastrous storm, she ceased work in 1897. The long south barn was destroyed by fire in May 1936 and the mill was purchased by Hove Corporation in 1937. The Elm tree lined track, used for decades by horse-pulled carts laden with cereal crops was replaced by tarmac as Holmes Avenue was extended northwards leaving the mill isolated on a central island as she is seen today. Volunteers from the ‘Friends of the Mill’ group have lovingly restored the mill to its former glory and with six floors open to view. Visitors can discover how grain is turned into flour in a traditional smock windmill and also explore a fascinating display of historical and agricultural exhibits.